CPR

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month!

Posted on by Trainer in AED, CPR, General, Rescue, Training Leave a comment

Did you know that sudden cardiac arrest takes the lives of over 300,000 Americans each year? According to Mary Newman, SCA Foundation president, “About 500 Americans suffer sudden cardiac arrest every day and only 30 survive.”

What is Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

According to Heartsine.com, Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a malfunction of the heart’s electrical system, which causes it suddenly and unexpectedly to begin to beat rapidly, then erratically, and finally to stop altogether. When this happens, the heart cannot pump blood effectively. As such, blood flow to the brain is compromised and the victim quickly loses consciousness.

What can we do to increase the survival rate?

  1. Get CPR/AED Certified
  2. Have better access to AED’s

Where can I get this type of Training?

Safety Training Pros is the premier safety training experts for individuals, groups, businesses, and government agencies.We provide professional training with high quality safety training materials in an engaging atmosphere so our clients have the life saving skills and knowledge that they need in an emergency. As a Licensed Training Partner of the American Red Cross, ASHI, and Medic First Aid, the leading providers of health and safety training, we can easily and efficiently provide the quality professional training required by all our customers. This includes, but is not limited to, CPR and AED training. Please call us for more information at 844-900-SAFE or visit us at safetytrainingpros.com.

 

 

 


Halloween Candy and Choking-Related Incidents Among Children

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, General, Pediatric, Rescue, Training Leave a comment

It’s that time of year again! Danger is lurking for your little goblins.

A study published July 20, 2013 in the journal Pediatrics looks at nonfatal food choking incidents among children 14 years or younger in the U.S.

    • An estimated 111,914 children ages 0 to 14 years were treated in US hospital emergency departments from 2001 through 2009 for nonfatal food-related choking, yielding an average of 12,435 children annually and a rate of 20.4 visits per 100 000 population.
    • The mean age of children treated for nonfatal food-related choking was 4.5 years.
    • Children aged ≤1 year accounted for 37.8% of cases
    • Male children accounted for more than one-half (55.4%) of cases.
    • Of all food types, hard candy was most frequently (15.5% [16 168 cases]) associated with choking, followed by other candy (12.8% [13 324]), meat (12.2% [12 671]), and bone (12.0% [12 496]).
    • Most patients (87.3% [97 509]) were treated and released, but 10.0% (11 218) were hospitalized, and 2.6% (2911) left against medical advice.

This Halloween, are you prepared to come to the aid of a child in an emergency?

Trick or Treat

Choking can occur when a solid object enters a narrowed part of the airway and becomes stuck. Young children are particularly at risk for choking because of the small size of their air passages, inexperience with chewing, and a natural tendency to put objects in their mouths.

On inhalation, the object can be drawn tighter into the airway and block air from entering the lungs. A forceful abdominal thrust beneath the ribs and up into the diaphragm can compress the air in the chest and “pop” the object out of the airway. Direct compression of the chest over the breastbone can also create enough pressure to expel an object and is typically used for obese or pregnant victims with blocked airways.

An emergency care provider must be able to recognize the difference between a mild blockage and a severe blockage.

With a mild blockage, a child can speak, cough, or gag. This type of blockage is typically cleared by coughing. Encourage a child with a mild blockage to cough forcibly. Stay close and be ready to take action if things worsen.

When a severe blockage occurs, a child cannot dislodge the object on her own. Signs of severe obstruction include very little or no air exchange, lack of sound, and the inability to speak or cough forcefully. The child may hold her hands to her throat as she attempts to clear an obstruction naturally.

Please note: Abdominal and chest thrusts can cause internal injury. Anyone who has been treated for choking with these maneuvers should be evaluated by EMS or a physician to ensure there were no injuries.

To help prevent choking, Kidshealth.org has some tips to keep in mind during all the upcoming treat-filled holidays:

    • Encourage kids to sit when eating and to chew thoroughly. Teach them to chew and swallow their food before talking or laughing.
    • Be especially vigilant during adult parties, when nuts and other foods might be easily accessible to small hands. Clean up promptly and carefully, and check the floor for dropped foods that can cause choking.
    • Never let kids run, play sports, or ride in the car with gum, candy, or lollipops in their mouths.

Ready to give yourself a treat and learn a few tricks at a first aid, CPR, and AED class near you?


Who is Resusci Anne?

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, General, Rescue, Training Leave a comment

We’ve all seen her, and many of us have learned our lifesaving CPR skills on her. You might ask who was the inspiration for that pleasant, yet enigmatic face on the Laerdal Resusci Anne manikin?

As originally reported by Kristine Rice of American Safety & Health Institute

It would seem that “Anne” came from the face of a French girl, found drowned in the Seine in Paris in the 19th century. The mouleurs (model-makers) were asked by a pathologist at the Paris mortuary to make a cast of the victim’s face, and it quickly became the mask-and-bust studio’s best-seller.

This little mask of the intriguing mystery girl has become fodder for poems, novels, and stories ever since, but the best use to which it was put came in the mid-1950s, when toymaker Asmund Laerdal used it for his first CPR manikin.

Snopes.com also weighs in on the story in their refutation of an urban legend about the origin of Resusci Anne’s peaceful visage. This often-repeated version credits Dr. Peter Safar, one of the creators of CPR, with modeling Anne after his own daughter, lost in a drowning accident.

Not quite, says Snopes. While Dr. Safar did unfortunately lose an 11-year-old daughter, it was not by drowning nor did he himself create a manikin. Our thanks instead must go to Laerdal for the creation that life-like manikin for CPR training still widely used today.

Safety Training Pros utilizes Laerdal manikins in all our CPR classes because of the realistic features, anatomically correct landmarks, audible feedback that reinforces the correct compression depth, and realistic chest compression resistance that allows our students to experience the amount of pressure needed to perform proper chest compressions in a real-life situation. Even though Laerdal manikins have one of the highest price points in the industry, the hands-on real-world simulation practice is worth it. Get rescue ready, get your CPR training from Safety Training Pros!


New Safety Training Pros Video

Posted on by SafetyPros in Aquatics, CPR, CPR for Business, General, Lifeguard, Professional Rescuers, Rescue, Training Leave a comment

We’ve been working hard on creating some new videos for your viewing pleasure and we’ll be rolling them out soon. Here is the first one! Let us know how you like it.

Don’t forget to ‘like’ us on Facebook!


Good Samaritans give CPR to cyclist

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, General, Rescue, Training Leave a comment

News, Weather and Sports for Lincoln, NE; KLKNTV.com

Great reporting by Jenn Schanz [email protected]:

“Bruce Benda and Buck Williams were looking forward to a day on the road with their motorcycles.

They had planned to ride to Branched Oak Lake, but took a detour in Pioneers Park on the way.

It was there, they saw a biker in desperate need of help.

“You could see there was no breathing, and there was really no distress, he was kind of just laying there curled up into a fetal position, and just…things weren’t right,” says Buck Williams, who performed CPR on the biker.

They thought the biker, a man they guessed was in his mid-fifties, may have had a heart attack.

While they waited for the ambulance to arrive, the two friends stayed by the mans side.

as Buck did CPR, Bruce comforted him.

“We made him as comfortable as we could, took his helmet off him. I put my sweatshirt underneath his head. Then we just proceeded to talk to him, tried to communicate with him. Let him know to hang on, that we were there,” says Bruce.

After minutes of compressions, Buck says the man had a pulse once the ambulance got there.

American Red Cross Training Specialist Sue Alby says it’s the first few minutes of a cardiac crisis that are key.

“For every minute a person goes without breathing, and essentially without a heartbeat, it can reduce their chance or survival by ten percent,” she says.

Buck and Bruce even made the trip to the hospital with the man, and visited him later that day.

Bruce says they don’t feel like heroes, they just did what anyone else would have done, looked out for one another.

The latest update on the biker is that he is critical, but stable condition. “

To get your American Red Cross CPR certification, call us at 916-538-6447 or click here to enroll in an upcoming CPR class.


How to Meet Current OSHA CPR & First Aid Training Requirements

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, CPR for Business, General, Training Leave a comment

Have you been meeting your OSHA mandated CPR and First Aid training requirements for your employees online? Online training alone does not provide the hands on CPR, First Aid practice required by current OSHA standards.

As OSHA states on its website osha.gov, “the word ‘train’ is defined as “[t]o make proficient with special instruction and practice,” Webster’s II New Collegiate Dictionary, 1995, p. 1,169. These standards require training in physical skills, such as bandaging and CPR. The only way these physical skills can be learned is by actually practicing them. OSHA’s Best Practices Guide: Fundamentals of a Workplace First-Aid Program, 2006, p. 11, states that a first-aid training program should have trainees develop hands-on skills through the use of mannequins and partner practice”.

When every second counts, your training matters! Train your employees right the first time with fun, fast, effective and affordable CPR and First Aid training from Safety Training Pros. Call us today to schedule your training at 916-538-6447 or visit us at www.safetytrainingpros.com

CPR certification, first aid training, OSHA training


The Importance of a CPR, First Aid Program

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, CPR for Business, Training Leave a comment

If an accident were to occur today in your workplace, would you know what to do? Would the employees injured be given the best possible care?

Creating a CPR and First Aid Program that meets the requirements of the law and is customized to the type and size of the workplace can make the difference between life and death or between recovery and permanent disability when an accident occurs.

Employers should make sure that all employees are familiar with the locations of their worksite emergency information and where it is posted. The notice should display the phone numbers of the closest ambulance service, fire and rescue unit, police station, and hospitals.  The amount of time it can take to look up this information can make a big difference to a seriously injured person.  The location of first aid equipment, the Automated External Defibrillator (AED), and rescue equipment should also be posted prominently.

Every work site should have a person with CPR & First Aid certification readily available in case of an emergency. First aid equipment and supplies, including a variety of dressings and instruments, as well as an up-to-date first aid manual, should be stored where they can be accessed quickly and easily in the event of an accident.  Supplies should be inspected regularly, making sure they are kept in sanitary and usable condition, and re-stocked after use.  Based on the size of the workplace, more than one fully equipped first aid kit may be required.

At remote work sites, emergency supplies and an action plan are particularly important. At least one person trained in emergency first aid should always be on-site.  First aid must be given correctly otherwise it can cause harm instead of helping an injured person. All workers should be familiar with who on-site is trained to give first aid, where the emergency first aid equipment is located, and what medical professional or medical facility should be contacted should a medical emergency occur.

Periodically review your company policy on first aid response with your workers so that all will understand and respond appropriately to injuries or illnesses that may occur on the jobsite. Consult with the professionals at Safety Training Pros for the best training for your situation.


Nearly two hours without a heartbeat; man lives to thank rescuers

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, Rescue Leave a comment

On January 1, 2013 twenty eight year old David Hillard was found outside in a water-filled ravine near his property. He had been outside for 14 hours and was unresponsive when found. He was suffering from hypothermia and his rescuers rated his chance of survival as nonexistent. On the way to the hospital he went into cardiac arrest.

Miraculous teamwork saved David’s life. Many emergency workers were involved including the EMT team, nurses, and other staff in the hospital emergency room. They performed CPR on David for 109 minutes. They did the chest compressions, ventilations, an AED, and administered medications, in what resulted in a successful effort to bring him back to life and stabilize his heartbeat.

Eleven days after the incident with the support of his family, he was able to thank his rescuers.

CPR saves lives – “When every second counts, your training matters”