CPR

How to Meet Current OSHA CPR & First Aid Training Requirements

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, CPR for Business, General, Training Leave a comment

Have you been meeting your OSHA mandated CPR and First Aid training requirements for your employees online? Online training alone does not provide the hands on CPR, First Aid practice required by current OSHA standards.

As OSHA states on its website osha.gov, “the word ‘train’ is defined as “[t]o make proficient with special instruction and practice,” Webster’s II New Collegiate Dictionary, 1995, p. 1,169. These standards require training in physical skills, such as bandaging and CPR. The only way these physical skills can be learned is by actually practicing them. OSHA’s Best Practices Guide: Fundamentals of a Workplace First-Aid Program, 2006, p. 11, states that a first-aid training program should have trainees develop hands-on skills through the use of mannequins and partner practice”.

When every second counts, your training matters! Train your employees right the first time with fun, fast, effective and affordable CPR and First Aid training from Safety Training Pros. Call us today to schedule your training at 916-538-6447 or visit us at www.safetytrainingpros.com

CPR certification, first aid training, OSHA training


The Importance of a CPR, First Aid Program

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, CPR for Business, Training Leave a comment

If an accident were to occur today in your workplace, would you know what to do? Would the employees injured be given the best possible care?

Creating a CPR and First Aid Program that meets the requirements of the law and is customized to the type and size of the workplace can make the difference between life and death or between recovery and permanent disability when an accident occurs.

Employers should make sure that all employees are familiar with the locations of their worksite emergency information and where it is posted. The notice should display the phone numbers of the closest ambulance service, fire and rescue unit, police station, and hospitals.  The amount of time it can take to look up this information can make a big difference to a seriously injured person.  The location of first aid equipment, the Automated External Defibrillator (AED), and rescue equipment should also be posted prominently.

Every work site should have a person with CPR & First Aid certification readily available in case of an emergency. First aid equipment and supplies, including a variety of dressings and instruments, as well as an up-to-date first aid manual, should be stored where they can be accessed quickly and easily in the event of an accident.  Supplies should be inspected regularly, making sure they are kept in sanitary and usable condition, and re-stocked after use.  Based on the size of the workplace, more than one fully equipped first aid kit may be required.

At remote work sites, emergency supplies and an action plan are particularly important. At least one person trained in emergency first aid should always be on-site.  First aid must be given correctly otherwise it can cause harm instead of helping an injured person. All workers should be familiar with who on-site is trained to give first aid, where the emergency first aid equipment is located, and what medical professional or medical facility should be contacted should a medical emergency occur.

Periodically review your company policy on first aid response with your workers so that all will understand and respond appropriately to injuries or illnesses that may occur on the jobsite. Consult with the professionals at Safety Training Pros for the best training for your situation.


Nearly two hours without a heartbeat; man lives to thank rescuers

Posted on by SafetyPros in CPR, Rescue Leave a comment

On January 1, 2013 twenty eight year old David Hillard was found outside in a water-filled ravine near his property. He had been outside for 14 hours and was unresponsive when found. He was suffering from hypothermia and his rescuers rated his chance of survival as nonexistent. On the way to the hospital he went into cardiac arrest.

Miraculous teamwork saved David’s life. Many emergency workers were involved including the EMT team, nurses, and other staff in the hospital emergency room. They performed CPR on David for 109 minutes. They did the chest compressions, ventilations, an AED, and administered medications, in what resulted in a successful effort to bring him back to life and stabilize his heartbeat.

Eleven days after the incident with the support of his family, he was able to thank his rescuers.

CPR saves lives – “When every second counts, your training matters”